Tuesday, February 19, 2013

NPR claims TV weather forecasters doubt man-made global warming because they 'don't know much about climate'

A highly biased report on NPR today claims that most TV weathercasters are afraid to discuss climate change because they "don't know much about climate science, and many who do are fearful of talking about something so polarizing." However, the poll upon which the NPR report is based instead shows the vast majority of weathercasters have studied the facts regarding climate change and only 19% agree with the IPCC claim that global warming is happening and is caused mostly by human activity. The report also notes, "But even many meteorologists who don't think it's all a hoax still profoundly distrust climate models" because ""They get reminded each and every day anytime their models don't prove to be correct." Note climate models are the same computer models used by weather forecasters, only run for much longer periods of time. Although these models struggle with forecasting tomorrow's weather, climate scientists assure us that they can determine global temperatures a century from now.

Forecasting Climate With A Chance Of Backlash


by JENNIFER LUDDEN NPR

When it comes to climate change, Americans place great trust in their local TV weathercaster, which has led climate experts to see huge potential for public education.

The only problem? Polls show most weather presenters don't know much about climate science, and many who do are fearful of talking about something so polarizing.

In fact, if you have heard a weathercaster speak on climate change, it's likely been to deny it. John Coleman in San Diego and Anthony Watts of Watts Up With That? are among a group of vocal die-hards, cranking out blog posts and videos countering climate science. But even many meteorologists who don't think it's all a hoax still profoundly distrust climate models.

"They get reminded each and every day anytime their models don't prove to be correct," says Ed Maibach, who directs the Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason University, and has carried out several surveys of TV weathercasters. "For them, the whole notion of projecting what the climate will be 30, 50, a hundred years from now, they've got a fairly high degree of skepticism."

Read the rest at NPR

From the poll of weather forecasters mentioned above

1. Global warming refers to the idea that the world’s average temperature has been increasing over the
past 150 years, may be increasing more in the future, and that the world’s climate may change as a result.

1a. What do you think? Do you think that global warming is happening?

Yes, and it is caused mostly by human activity 19% [as claimed by the IPCC]
Yes, it is caused more-or-less equally by human activity and natural events 35%
Yes, and it is caused mostly by natural events 29%
Don’t know* 8%
No 9%

n=433. * Three respondents skipped this question and were treated as having answered "Don't know."

1b. [If Q1 is Don't know] Which of the following statements best describes why you are undecided about
whether or not global warming is happening?

I haven’t had adequate opportunity to study the facts. 3%
I’m just not interested in the topic. 0%
I have concluded there is equal evidence on both sides of the argument 6%
I have concluded that currently there is insufficient evidence to prove either position. 44%
I have concluded that currently there is insufficient evidence to attribute the relative
contributions of human vs. natural factors. 38%
Other (see Appendix for detailed responses) 9%

n=32 100%

1 comment:

  1. Weathercasters "... don't know much about climate science ...". Translation: they know enough about climate science to know what they don't know. "Climate" spreads in a thousand directions, involves perhaps 100+ scientific and technical disciplines. This is why so few people who know anything refer to themselves as "climate scientists". IMHO the ones that do, tend to manifest Dunning-Kruger effect.

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